HOCKADAY MUSEUM of ART
Gateway to Montana's Artistic Legacy
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Cutbank River, by Ted Marble Roy E. "Ted" Marble (1883 - 1938) Ted Marble grew up in Big Rapids, Michigan. In 1913 he was hired by the Great Northern Railway. Marble made his home just outside the west entrance of Glacier. His first studio was a tent, but he was later given a cabin next to the Lewis Hotel at Lake McDonald to use for processing his photographs. Marble, 5' 3" and 110 pounds, carried a large format camera weighing over 30 pounds everywhere he went. The intrepid photographer trekked across precipitous mountain trails and through rough terrain in order to capture the essence of the Park. During World War I, Marble enlisted at Fort Wright, Spokane. He was transferred to Rochester, New York where he spent several months studying at the Eastman Kodak School. In October 1918, he was sent to France to serve in the photographic department of the Army Air Services. After his discharge the following June, Marble returned to work for the Great Northern Railway, and at last began to receive recognition for his photographs. On July 22, 1938, 55 year-old Ted Marble died from heart complications caused by tuberculosis. In 1963, his estate donated 500 of his negatives to Glacier National Park.