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Gateway to Montana's Artistic Legacy
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Edward Borein (1872 - 1945)

   John Edward Borein was  a proficient roper and rider before his work was printed in The Land of Sunshine magazine in 1896 -- work that was submitted only after strong encouragement from his cowhand acquaintances. His friendship with the magazine's founder, Charles Fletcher Lummis, would last until the latter's death.
By 1900 he had returned to his childhood home in Oakland. In 1904 he began to work in earnest as an illustrator for bay area newspapers and magazines, including Sunset Magazine.
   On the recommendation of friends, Borein moved to New York in 1907 to immerse himself in the fast-paced illustrators' world. Borein spent twelve of the most productive and rewarding years of his career in the East. Borein maintained friendships with many Western artists, including C M. Russell and Maynard Dixon, as well as a wide circle of New York illustrators. He also had long-standing friendships with other celebrities, including Jack London, Teddy Roosevelt, Annie Oakley, "Buffalo Bill" Cody, Will Rogers, and many people involved in the early Western film industry.
   He returned to California permanently in 1919 and remained there for the rest of his life as a prolific and successful independent artist.

   Borein's concern was to convey a flavor of authenticity without pretension, factual fussiness, or complex aesthetic effects, based in the concrete facts of the life he lived and observed.